genetics, Responsible Breeding

Cardigan Welsh Corgi color genetics part 3

 

Combinations as seen in the Cardigan

The brindle

i.     A locus: a^y, meaning it is red/sable

ii.     B locus: B, meaning all of the black will be black, not brown

iii.     D locus: D, meaning all the black will be black, not blue

iv.     E locus: either E or E^m, meaning that the dog can express black pigment and may have a black mask

v.     G locus: g, non-greying (Cardigans seem to all be non-greying)

vi.     I locus: either absent (deep brindle) or present (wheaten brindle)

vii.     K locus: K^br, meaning the black is confined to stripes and is not allowed to spread over the whole body

viii.     M locus: mm, or non-merle

ix.     Spotting: Likely “herding spotted,” which gives white feet, partial or full collar, white blaze and white tailtip

 

The red/sable

i.     A locus: a^y, meaning it is red/sable

ii.     B locus: B, meaning all of the black will be black, not brown

iii.     D locus: D, meaning the dog is black, not blue

iv.     E locus: either E or E^m, meaning the dog can express black pigment and may have a black mask

v.     G locus: g, non-greying

vi.     I locus: Either absent (red) or present (wheaten or cream red)

vii.     K locus: k^y, meaning the dog is not black or brindle

viii.     M locus: mm, or non-merle

ix.     Spotting: Likely “herding spotted”

 

The tricolor (black and tan with white spotting)

i.     A locus: a^t, meaning it is red/sable but the sable is confined to the points and reveals whatever color is beneath

ii.     B locus: B, the dog is black and not brown

iii.     D locus: D, meaning the dog is black and not blue

iv.     E locus: either E or E^m, meaning the dog can express black pigment and may have a black mask

v.     G locus: g, non-greying

vi.     I locus: either absent (deep red points) or present (yellow/cream points)

vii.     K locus: k^y, meaning the dog is not black or brindle

viii.     M locus: mm, non-merle

ix.     Spotting: Likely “herding spotted”

 

The black and white (black, brindle points, with white spotting)

i.     A locus: a^t, meaning it is red/sable but the sable is confined to the points and reveals whatever color is beneath

ii.     B locus: B, the dog is black and not brown

iii.     D locus: D, the dog is black and not blue

iv.     E locus: either E or E^m, the dog can express black pigment and may have a black mask

v.     G locus: g, non-greying

vi.     I locus: either absent (deep brindle points) or present (wheaten brindle points)

vii.     K locus: K^br, meaning the dog is brindle

viii.     M locus: mm, non-merle

ix.     Spotting: likely “herding spotted”

 

The merle

ANY of the above, with one M on the merle locus. Cardigans can be sable merle, brindle merle, or merle-plus-black-and-tan/brindle.

 

 

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4 Comments

  • Reply Why So Frost March 22, 2011 at 7:49 pm

    MMMMMMM genetics <3 Nothing I dont already know, of course, but its still fascinating

  • Reply Mike March 23, 2011 at 12:42 am

    Very interesting…

    This final post would be much better with picture examples of each.

  • Reply Nancy March 24, 2011 at 2:33 pm

    My brain hurts, but I find this fascinating. Thanks!!

  • Reply Lauren April 13, 2012 at 12:27 pm

    I know this is an older post, but if it helps you any, I have always heard “herding spotted” referred to as “Irish spotted” or “Irish white”
    http://colorgenetics.info/canine/content/white-patterns
    And here’s an interesting page about the Catahoula and merle, piebald and Irish spotting in that breed.
    http://www.donabney.com/issue_merle.php
    Also, “phantom” merles may be rare, but they do exist, they are often thought to be just pointed or ticked, because in the (very few) “phantoms” I’ve seen, the merleing only shows very minimally in the lighter color. For example, I’ve seen a red merle Aussie with tan points, there was some very minimal merling in the (also minimal) tan points. You have to be looking for it and it doesn’t happen often, though more often in Catahoulas, and if there is even one diluted hair, then genetically the dog is a merle.
    In the picture on the Catahoula page, the dark puppy with the lighter foot (it does look like it’s just heavily ticked unless you’re looking for the merle) is genetically just as merle as his flashier littermates.
    I don’t know which DNA test he used, but I have known breeders of Catahoulas who always pull their pups out into the sunlight to check them many times as they are growing to look for those few diluted hairs, especially on the face, paws and under the tail.
    I wish I had been able to take a picture of that Aussie.

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