After the dog show in Wrentham we took the kids out to the AMAZING World's End in Hingham. I'd been hearing about it for years; I even interned for the Trustees in college. But we'd never been. Well, after visiting I can absolutely understand why people go nuts for it. Not only is Hingham pleasurably snooty – we filled our picnic basket with rosemary chicken, microbrewed root beer, fresh sushi, and chocolate – but the reservation itself is like New England in miniature. We walked for a good three miles, from rocky coast into pine woods and then to open fields, vast blackberry patches, and hardwoods. We ended at a shale beach to watch the sun go down. 

 

The kids were able to swim in tiny protected coves and stand on rocks to wave to the sailboats and yachts as they motored past.

 

Unfortunately, as you may have heard, since Friday is a show dog we had to keep her from being a real dog while we were there. After all, we have to protect that perfect grooming job and her precious perfect condition. It's too bad, but that's the price you pay for your ego when you have show dogs.

Can you imagine what would happen if she got salt water in her coat?

 

We kept her on the soft short grass to protect her soft pads.

 

She cannot be allowed to risk her delicate digestion by licking chicken and sushi and root beer off the baby's hands.

 

Most of all, and this is critically important, she must not get sand and dirt and rock in her coat or ears. 

 

Anyway, after running around and stressing about protecting Friday's perfection, we sat and watched the sun set over the harbor.

Ginny sat with Honour and watched too.

Until Honour ate her head. 

Hey, that rosemary chicken was delicious but tiny. Can't be helped.

We got back to the front entrance as the sun slipped behind the hill, which was fifteen minutes after the gate was supposed to close. The volunteer ranger, who had gorgeous white hair and whose shoes cost more than several of our dogs, yelled at us in an extremely polite and reserved manner.

I love Hingham.

 

By the time we got up to town, it was so late that the fireworks were about to begin. People had been sitting on the Esplanade since 7 AM, tens of thousands of them by noon, waiting to see the show. We got in eight minutes before the Stars and Stripes Forever played, and thanks to Doug's genius super-secret super-awesome vantage point, we sat with THREE OTHER PEOPLE and watched the show over the beautifully lit skyline. 

We sang along, drank the last of the root beer, and then the kids tumbled into the car and were asleep before we got back on the highway.

The End.

Of a very good day.